Gay dating in jean lafitte louisiana dating someone who works on an oil rig

Rated 3.86/5 based on 987 customer reviews

Even the ordinary people were forced into the act of burying things since banks catered only to the wealthy as little as 150 years ago.

Take all this, plus the occasional finding of an old map allegedly pointing out treasure spots or parts of trinkets and treasures, and you have proof enough—at least for the treasure hunters—that Louisiana is a paradise for fortune seekers.

gay dating in jean lafitte louisiana-42

Pirates like Lafitte and Pierre Rameau and land bandit John Murrell once called Louisiana home and, carrying on an age-old tradition, no doubt hid much loot that lies undiscovered to this day.

His treasure hunt, however, paid off later in an unexpected locale.

He found

Pirates like Lafitte and Pierre Rameau and land bandit John Murrell once called Louisiana home and, carrying on an age-old tradition, no doubt hid much loot that lies undiscovered to this day.

His treasure hunt, however, paid off later in an unexpected locale.

He found $1,300 in two caskets just across the river from New Orleans.

No one knows for sure how much of Lafitte’s loot is left for treasure hunters but there are cases on record to prove that the story of Jean Lafitte’s fabulous gold is a little bit more than legend. Disregarding the methods of most treasure hunters, Patorno in 1935 invented a radio device which responded to nonmagnetic metals.

Then he hired out for his services and the makeshift semblance of a Geiger counter for $25 a day.

||

Pirates like Lafitte and Pierre Rameau and land bandit John Murrell once called Louisiana home and, carrying on an age-old tradition, no doubt hid much loot that lies undiscovered to this day.His treasure hunt, however, paid off later in an unexpected locale.He found $1,300 in two caskets just across the river from New Orleans.No one knows for sure how much of Lafitte’s loot is left for treasure hunters but there are cases on record to prove that the story of Jean Lafitte’s fabulous gold is a little bit more than legend. Disregarding the methods of most treasure hunters, Patorno in 1935 invented a radio device which responded to nonmagnetic metals.Then he hired out for his services and the makeshift semblance of a Geiger counter for $25 a day.

,300 in two caskets just across the river from New Orleans.

No one knows for sure how much of Lafitte’s loot is left for treasure hunters but there are cases on record to prove that the story of Jean Lafitte’s fabulous gold is a little bit more than legend. Disregarding the methods of most treasure hunters, Patorno in 1935 invented a radio device which responded to nonmagnetic metals.

Then he hired out for his services and the makeshift semblance of a Geiger counter for a day.

Leave a Reply