Which types of rock are used in radiometric dating

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The effect of this on alpha decay, which is the most common decay mode in radiometric dating, is utterly insignificant.

There is another effect that takes place in the "electron capture" type of Beta decay.

The phenomenon we know as heat is simply the jiggling around of atoms and their components, so in principle a high enough temperature could cause the components of the core to break out.

However, the temperature required to do this is in in the millions of degrees, so this cannot be achieved by any natural process that we know about.

The major reason that decay rates can change is that the electric field, from the atom's electron cloud, can change due to chemical changes.

The second way that a nucleus could be disrupted is by particles striking it.

However, the nucleus has a strong positive charge and the electron shells have a strong negative charge. Those that can decay are mesons and baryons, which include protons and neutrons; although decays can involve other particles such as photons, electrons, positrons, and neutrinos.

That is, electrons can move closer to or farther away from the nucleus depending on the chemical bonds.

This affects the coulomb barrier involved in Alpha decay, and therefore changes the height and width of the barrier through which the alpha particle must tunnel.

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